Archive-name Miscellmilehightxt

Archive-author:
Archive-title: Regulation of Mile High Club Operations

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION
Federal Aviation Administration
14 CFR Part 61
(Docket No. 75487345, Notice No. 88-523040306)

REGULATION OF MILE HIGH CLUB OPERATIONS

ACTION: Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM)

SUMMARY: This notice proposes to require additional qualifica-
tions and testing before a certificated pilot may engage or
continue to engage in Mile High Club Operations (MHCO) while also
exercising the privileges of a pilot certificate.

DATES: Comments should be received before December 31, 1999.

ADDRESSES: Comments may be mailed or delivered in sextuplicate
to: Federal Aviation Administration, Office of Chief Counsel,
Attention: Rules Docket (AGC-204), Docket No. 75487345, 800
Independence Avenue SW, Washington DC 20591. Comments may be
examined in the Rules Docket weekdays, except Federal holidays,
between 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

Need for Rulemaking

Under the provisions of the East Chitlin Switch, Kansas, Wheat
Silo Subsidy Act (P.L. 100-872398-A), Congress has mandated the
FAA to regulate the activities of the formerly unregulated Mile
High Club (MHC). Under present rules, anything accomplished at
an altitude of one statute mile (5,280 feet) above ground level
(AGL), regardless of the degree of difficulty or the level of
expertise demanded, earns a certificated pilot a scroll illus-
trated by Milton Caniff and a three-color bumper sticker.
Through a procedure of self-regulation, the organization has set
forth requirements that activities take place at an altitude of
at least 5,280 feet above ground level to prevent Denver pilots
from messing around on the ramp. Although the organization has
adopted rigid admission requirements for its pilot members, a
recent National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) report dis-
closed an accident in a light training aircraft (LTA) caused by
pilot error in the form of disorientation of a student pilot (sex
unknown) after the Certified Flight Instructor (CFI) (sex un-
known) attempted to introduce the student to a maneuver not
…End of the part1. To be continued..

Comments are closed.

Archive-name Miscellmilehightxt

Archive-author:
Archive-title: Regulation of Mile High Club Operations

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION
Federal Aviation Administration
14 CFR Part 61
(Docket No. 75487345, Notice No. 88-523040306)

REGULATION OF MILE HIGH CLUB OPERATIONS

ACTION: Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM)

SUMMARY: This notice proposes to require additional qualifica-
tions and testing before a certificated pilot may engage or
continue to engage in Mile High Club Operations (MHCO) while also
exercising the privileges of a pilot certificate.

DATES: Comments should be received before December 31, 1999.

ADDRESSES: Comments may be mailed or delivered in sextuplicate
to: Federal Aviation Administration, Office of Chief Counsel,
Attention: Rules Docket (AGC-204), Docket No. 75487345, 800
Independence Avenue SW, Washington DC 20591. Comments may be
examined in the Rules Docket weekdays, except Federal holidays,
between 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

Need for Rulemaking

Under the provisions of the East Chitlin Switch, Kansas, Wheat
Silo Subsidy Act (P.L. 100-872398-A), Congress has mandated the
FAA to regulate the activities of the formerly unregulated Mile
High Club (MHC). Under present rules, anything accomplished at
an altitude of one statute mile (5,280 feet) above ground level
(AGL), regardless of the degree of difficulty or the level of
expertise demanded, earns a certificated pilot a scroll illus-
trated by Milton Caniff and a three-color bumper sticker.
Through a procedure of self-regulation, the organization has set
forth requirements that activities take place at an altitude of
at least 5,280 feet above ground level to prevent Denver pilots
from messing around on the ramp. Although the organization has
adopted rigid admission requirements for its pilot members, a
recent National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) report dis-
closed an accident in a light training aircraft (LTA) caused by
pilot error in the form of disorientation of a student pilot (sex
unknown) after the Certified Flight Instructor (CFI) (sex un-
known) attempted to introduce the student to a maneuver not
…End of the part1. To be continued..

Comments are closed.